Author Archives: clanier

How to Write Instructions

by Michael LaTorra Introduction Every set of instructions should begin with an Introduction. The Introduction should tell the reader a little bit about what the instructions are for, and who can perform these instructions, including mentioning any dangers involved. For example, the instructions might be about how to use an arc welder. The reader should…
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How to Write Instructions” »

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How to Write Instructions

MLA Style Quick Reference for Citations

1) Embedded quotes from poetry (approx. 1-3 lines):  In “Sonnet 20,” Shakespeare’s speaker calls his ambiguously-gendered beloved the “master mistress of my passion” (l. 2). Identify any line breaks in the printed text with slash marks: e.g., “A woman’s face wih nature’s own hand painted, / Hast thou, the master mistress of my passion” (ll….
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MLA Style Quick Reference for Citations” »

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MLA Style Quick Reference for Citations

Using Tell, Show, Share in Your Writing

Tell, Show, Share is a way of framing your secondary sources in the text of your essay. The term TSS is a shorthand to describe the steps that all writers and scholars use in introducing outside ideas to their writing. TSS is the building block of all scholarly work. Below is a passage from the…
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Using Tell, Show, Share in Your Writing” »

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Using Tell, Show, Share in Your Writing

Summaries

A summary is a general restatement of the meaning of a passage. It focuses on the main idea or ideas of the piece. When you write a summary, you take the essence of a piece of writing and rewrite it in you own words, usually eliminating many of the details and illustrative examples. Summaries vary…
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Summaries” »

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Summaries

Exclamation Points

Use the exclamation point after interjections and other expressions that need special emphasis to show strong emotion, such as surprise, or disbelief. Boo! What a game! Look at that tornado! Run for your life! The exclamation  point should be used sparingly. If you use it too frequently, it loses the emphasis you wanted it to…
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Exclamation Points” »

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Exclamation Points